Roman Agora of Thessaloniki

Roman Agora of Thessaloniki

The first building phase of the Roman Agora of Thessaloniki dates back to the middle of the 1st century AD. In this phase, the east wing is organized with a central rectangular space – a boulevard, framed by four rooms on either side. 
Thus the city acquires the first closed gathering place of its beginnings. In the next century (2nd AD) the conservatory is built. 
A small, covered theater, which occupies the space of the boulevard, as well as the two adjoining halls. 
The new space, in addition to meeting the needs of the administration, also hosts artistic performances. 
In the 3rd century AD. 
the conservatory is being renovated. 
In order for the orchestra to grow, the first six rows of stands are removed and its level is raised by 1.00 m. This creates, between the orchestra and the first row of hollow stands, 
an altitude difference of up to 1.60 m. This difference requires the simultaneous elevation of the stage, in order to reach the level of the spectators of the first series. Given that the conservatory of Thessaloniki is part of a building complex and it is not possible to hollow access, all entrances (five), spectators and actors, were placed in front of the complex. 
The extreme entrances were intended for the actors, who entered the backstage and from there to the orchestra and the stage. 
The audience used the three intermediates, which led to a space just below the floor of the stage and then reached the concave through stairs. 
In the middle of the 4th century, the works for the expansion of the conservatory and its transformation into a theater began. 
A ring is made, 
which surrounds the existing concave, 15.00m wide. 
as the infrastructure of the new cavity. 
The tent is raised, reaching the lintels of the entrances, and expands, occupying the corresponding part of the inner portico of the Agora. 
At the same time, the three main entrances of the public are closed, for the entrance of which two staircases were constructed in the adjacent areas, leading to the central frieze of the cavity. As it seems, according to the archeological data, this phase was not completed. 
At the end of the 4th century AD. 
The abandonment of the Roman Agora begins and the conservatory is transformed, with the necessary works, into a funnel for the reception and collection of rainwater. 
occupying the corresponding part of the inner portico of the Market. 
At the same time, the three main entrances of the public are closed, for the entrance of which two staircases were constructed in the adjacent areas, leading to the central frieze of the cavity. As it seems, according to the archeological data, this phase was not completed. 
At the end of the 4th century AD. 
The abandonment of the Roman Agora begins and the conservatory is transformed, with the necessary works, into a funnel for the reception and collection of rainwater. 
occupying the corresponding part of the inner portico of the Market. 
At the same time, the three main entrances of the public are closed, for the entrance of which two staircases were constructed in the adjacent areas, leading to the central frieze of the cavity. As it seems, according to the archeological data, this phase was not completed. 
At the end of the 4th century AD. 
The abandonment of the Roman Agora begins and the conservatory is transformed, with the necessary works, into a funnel for the reception and collection of rainwater.

Recent Posts

%d bloggers like this: